Author Topic: Pirate Utopias and "Kings of Love"  (Read 1341 times)

Offline footballmom10

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Pirate Utopias and "Kings of Love"
« on: February 17, 2008, 01:06:54 PM »
Cowboy Up picked this one up and it is too good not to have it's own topic. :P

The book "Kings of Love" was right next to the Koran and I bet that the Koran was just a distraction.

The book, as pointed out by Cowboy Up, is written by Peter Lamborn Wilson (and he has an interesting history). 

Wilson is famous for, among other things, writing about pirate utopian societies on small islands.  I found this on wikipedia:

Pirate utopias were described by essayist Peter Lamborn Wilson (aka Hakim Bey) in his 1995 book Pirate Utopias: Moorish Corsairs & European Renegadoes, and in his earlier essay Temporary Autonomous Zone (TAZ), as secret islands once used for supply purposes by pirates that were early forms of autonomous "mini societies" existing beyond the realm and reach of governments. These pirate enclaves typify proto-anarchist societies in that they operated beyond laws and governments and, in their stead, embraced freedom.

[edit] Pirate utopias of the Barbary Coast
Located on the Barbary Coast (Salé, Algiers, Tunis...), those pirate utopias were haven for Muslim Corsairs from the 16th to the 19th century. The pirates, dubbed "Barbary Pirates", ravaged European shipping operations and enslaved many thousands of captives. However, thousands of Europeans also converted to Islam, forming the "Renegados" and joining the pirate holy war. Wilson shows that these men and women were not only apostates and traitors, as they were considered in their homelands: their voluntary betrayal of Christendom can also be thought of as a praxis of social resistance. Wilson focuses on the Pirate Republic of Salé, in 17th century Morocco, which can be considered a type of micronation, since like other pirate states, it used to pass treaties from time to time with some European countries, agreeing not to attack their fleets. Wilson's idea of Temporary Autonomous Zones developed from his historical review of pirate utopias.

 

What do you think?

Wilson also writes about this idea of autonomous zones which is very similar to what the others seem to have espoused.  From Wikipedia....Temorary Autonomous Zones:

The Temporary Autonomous Zone (TAZ) describes the socio-political tactic of creating temporary spaces that elude formal structures of control. The essay uses various historical and philosophical examples, all of which attempt to lead the reader to the conclusion that the best way to create a non-hierarchical system of social relationships is to concentrate on the present and on releasing one's own mind from the controlling mechanisms that have been imposed on it.

In the formation of a TAZ, Bey argues that information becomes a key tool that sneaks into the cracks of formal procedures. A new territory of the moment is created that is on the boundary line of established regions. Any attempt at permanence that goes beyond the moment deteriorates to a structured system that inevitably stifles individual creativity. It is this chance at creativity that is real empowerment


My gosh, I never realized there was so many layers to this show.  I want to go back and watch all of the seasons and read the old posts!!!!   :D

Do you think that the island is a pirate utopia, the last pirate utopia?  Do you think that Wilson's idea that permanence stifles creativity has to do with somehow time not mattering?  If so, is there a way for time not to matter?

(Again, thanks to Cowboy Up whose keen eyes and attention to detail allowed me to see what I wasn't seeing)
« Last Edit: February 17, 2008, 11:47:12 PM by footballmom10 »

Offline LostAndSeek

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Re: Pirate Utopias
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2008, 03:35:50 PM »
Well, if the early history of the Island becomes important then you sure could be on to something.

I do think the permanence breeds stagnation may become a theme. If we're dealing with very long lived people, as Richard appears to be, then it'll be interesting to see how stagnant the Others' society had become before Dharma and Ben shook things up.

Offline footballmom10

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Re: Pirate Utopias
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2008, 04:31:32 PM »
I didn't get that from the reading so much.  What I heard was the necessity of letting go of the past and living in the moment.  That allows creativity and the realization of our abilities.

Offline laklost

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Re: Pirate Utopias
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2008, 08:10:42 PM »
Two things came to my mind.  One was Sawyer ready to leave the real world and play house on the island.  Yeah, he's a pirate, all right.

The other is Locke.  Locke fundamentally blundered in 4x03 by taking the anti-boatie Losties (dear Heaven, I did NOT just write that...). It was a mistake of hubris.  He didn't want to just know what to do next, he wanted everyone to SEE that he knew the Big Man.  It reminded me of his fawning over Mike and Jan the weed growers and wanting to get Eddie in.  He so much wants to prove his worth.  But his worth will never be in trying to get glory for himself.  His best way to create a non-hierarchical system of social relationships is to concentrate on the present and on releasing one's own mind from the controlling mechanisms that have been imposed on it. - to quote from Mom's post.  In other words, his power is when he eats the funky mud and lets his humility put him seeking, barechested back in the wheelchair, so to speak.

Offline dorathcrasy

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Re: Pirate Utopias and "Kings of Love"
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2008, 08:00:10 AM »
good point!! I believe it really make sense

first , I noticed the location,"Salé, Algiers, Tunis..."  they are all very familiar words in lost, maybe it can explain the skeleton of the Polarbear in Tunis  ;D

and then, the time 16th to the 19th century is similar to the period of Black Rock

 "mini societies" just like the others' village

“information becomes a key tool that sneaks into the cracks of formal procedures”  reminds me what Ben did in lost




Offline Lion of Atreides

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Re: Pirate Utopias and "Kings of Love"
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2008, 03:07:11 AM »
The whole text:
http://www.hermetic.com/bey/taz_cont.html

In the Will To Power as Disappearance section:

We're not talking here about literally vanishing from the world and its future:--no escape backward in time to paleolithic "original leisure society"--no forever utopia, no backmountain hideaway, NO ISLAND...


And this vivid bit of text:

"God"'s last throes and deathbed rattles have been going on for such a long time--in the form of Capitalism, Fascism, and Communism, for example--that there's still a lot of "creative destruction" to be carried out by post-Bakuninist post-Nietzschean commandos or apaches (literally "enemies") of the old Consensus. These nomads practice the razzia, they are corsairs, they are viruses; they have both need and desire for TAZs, camps of black tents under the desert stars, interzones, hidden fortified oases along secret caravan routes, "liberated" bits of jungle and bad-land, no-go areas, black markets, and underground bazaars.

"post-Bakuninist"? does that mean our Patchy is truly dead?   :o
« Last Edit: February 21, 2008, 03:28:24 AM by Lion of Atreides »