Author Topic: Is Rachel Really a Ray?  (Read 6370 times)

Offline puff6962

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2007, 10:32:01 PM »
By the way, did anybody see ovaries on that MRI?  I saw a coronal section of the abdomen/pelvis at the level of the femoral heads.  There's a central mass, presumably a fetus, but I can't recall seeing any ovaries or fallopian tubes.  They may be retrograde / behind the uterus (or whatever).

Are we looking at a female or something else?  READ ON, I PROMISE THIS WILL BE GOOD.

Juliet's sister suffers from Androgen Insensitivity Sysdrome.  Urban legends abound that a certain movie star suffers this disorder.  Also hypothesized, Joan of Arc.  Sufferers are genotypically male (XY) but lack androgen receptors necessary to produce a phenotypic male.  Classically, they lack secondary body hair, have a shallow vagina, undecended testes, and may develop mammary glands as estrogen receptors are present.  Commonly, if unrecognized, the individual may develop testicular carcinoma (which is more common with undescended testes).  They are infertile except in the hands of a crazy doctor sister.



Cancer, Female but Male, Infertile...Rachel's got Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome.


From Wikipedia:

Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS, or "Androgen resistance syndrome") is a set of disorders of sexual differentiation that results from mutations of the gene encoding the androgen receptor.

Complete AIS
People with CAIS are girls or women with internal testes, 46,XY karyotypes, and normal female bodies by external appearance. However the vagina is not as deep, and there are no ovaries or uterus— hence no menses or fertility. Gender identity is almost always female.

Natural history of CAIS
If a 46,XY fetus cannot respond to testosterone or DHT, only the non-androgenic aspects of male development begin to take place: formation of testes, production of testosterone and anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) by the testes, and suppression of müllerian ducts. The testes usually remain in the abdomen, or occasionally move into the inguinal canals but can go no further because there is no scrotum. AMH prevents the uterus and upper vagina from forming. The testes make male amounts of testosterone and DHT but no androgenic sexual differentiation occurs. Most of the prostate and other internal male genital ducts fail to form because of lack of testosterone. A shallow vagina forms, surrounded by normally-formed labia. Phallic tissue remains small and becomes a clitoris. At birth, a child with CAIS appears to be a typical girl, with no reason to suspect an incongruous karyotype and testosterone level, or lack of uterus.

Puberty tends to begin slightly later than the average for girls. As the hypothalamus and pituitary signal the testes to produce testosterone, amounts more often associated with boys begin to appear in the blood. Some of the testosterone is converted into estradiol, which begins to induce normal breast development. Normal reshaping of the pelvis and redistribution of body fat occurs as in other girls. Little or no pubic hair or other androgenic hair appears, sometimes a source of worry or shame. Acne is rare.

As menarche typically occurs about two years after breast development begins, no one usually worries about lack of menstrual periods until a girl reaches 14 or 15 years of age. At that point, an astute physician may suspect the diagnosis just from the breast/hair discrepancy. Diagnosis of complete AIS is confirmed by discovering an adult male testosterone level, 46,XY karotype, and a shallow vagina with no cervix or uterus.

Optimal timing of removal of the testes has been the management issue most often debated by physicians, though whether it is necessary has been questioned as well. The advantage of leaving testes until after puberty is that pubertal changes will happen "naturally," without hormone replacement.
   
The primary argument for removal is that testes remaining in the abdomen throughout life may develop benign or malignant tumors and confer little benefit. The testicular cancer risk in CAIS appears to be higher than that which occurs with men whose testes have remained in the abdomen.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2007, 06:34:56 PM by puff6962 »

Offline JBRam

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2007, 10:39:23 PM »
That is an extraordinarily long post... lol

Offline puff6962

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2007, 10:46:40 PM »
Also, from Lostpedia, the Biblical reference to Rachel includes the following:

Rachel is the name of Jacob's wife in the Book of Genesis. Rachel was disgraced because she had bore no children to Jacob, but her sister and second wife of Jacob, Leah, bore six children (Genesis 30). In the end, God grants Rachel children one of whom is Joseph (essentially restoring her honor). Rachel died in childbirth with her second son Benjamin.

Offline FrostyLosty

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2007, 05:13:32 PM »
True that, she may be infertile not because of the cancer, but becuase s/he used to be male.

Offline puff6962

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2007, 05:36:02 PM »
Yes, Juliet discovered during college that her sister wasn't maturing properly and had not public hair.  The parents were directed to a world famous doctor with a strange accent (Dr. Dharma) who diagnosed her condition  immediately.  Juliet finds out that she used to play in the bathtub with her  brother.  The news was traumatic, to say the least. 

 Rachel came to grips with the fact that her genes said one thing, but she was really a female.  She continued to live as such and opted for no surgery to remove the undescended testes.  As life wore on, Rachel bemoaned the fact that she would never have kids while Juliet, driven by the affliction of her sister, went into medicine and fertility research.  In the mix, Rachel found out that she had cancer (testicular) and now the race was on to save her life. 

Juliet's research meanwhile flourished and, with Rachel in remission, the dream that she had dared to suppose came true.  She could induce a pregnancy in her "sister" even though she had only an incomplete uterus to work with.  Rachel would truly become a "female" and a "mother."  The guinea pigs were pumping them out like m & m's so it's just gostas work on Rachel.  A few injections later, and "I'm preggars."  Whooo hoooo! 

But, then the dark and sinister presence of the Other's entered this Norman Rockwell moment.  Juliet was whisked away to help starving metrosexual people on a deserted island make mini-Others.  Little did Juliet know that the island was populated with gay men and lesbians who didn't believe in artificial insemination.  Moreover, how could she have known that Benj and the boys didn't want surrogates, they wanted big bellies, morning sickness, and pissing every twenty minutes.  Not that there's anything wrong with that.  Juliet plodded aimlessly while working day and night....all in the hope that she could one day return and visit her brother, no I mean, sister and be the uncle, no I mean aunt, that she's always hoped to be.  What is to become of our resident mad scientist as she seeks new fodder for her work?  Will she turn Lost into The Island of Doctor Moreau, mixing guinea pig genes with Ben to make a Bennea Pig?  Tune in next week for another edition of As the Juliet Turns.....
« Last Edit: April 18, 2007, 06:14:45 PM by puff6962 »

Offline JBRam

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2007, 06:16:10 PM »
Yes, Juliet discovered during college that her sister wasn't maturing properly and had not public hair.  The parents were directed to a world famous doctor with a strange accent (Dr. Dharma) who diagnosed her condition  immediately.  Juliet finds out that she used to play in the bathtub with her  brother.  The news was traumatic, to say the least.

 Rachel came to grips with the fact that her genes said one thing, but she was really a female.  She continued to live as such and opted for no surgery to remove the undescended testes.  As life wore on, Rachel bemoaned the fact that she would never have kids while Juliet, driven by the affliction of her sister, went into medicine and fertility research.  In the mix, Rachel found out that she had cancer (testicular) and now the race was on to save her life. 

Juliet's research meanwhile flourished and, with Rachel in remission, the dream that she had dared to suppose came true.  She could induce a pregnancy in her "sister" even though she had only an incomplete uterus to work with.  Rachel would truly become a "female" and a "mother."  The guinea pigs were pumping them out like m & m's so it's just gostas work on Rachel.  A few injections later, and "I'm preggars."  Whooo hoooo! 

But, then the dark and sinister presence of the Other's entered this Norman Rockwell moment.  Juliet was whisked away to help starving metrosexual people on a deserted island make mini-Others.  Little did Juliet know that the island was populated with gay men and lesbians who didn't believe in artificial insemination.  Moreover, how could she have known that Benj and the boys didn't want surrogates, they wanted big bellies, morning sickness, and pissing every twenty minutes.  Not that there's anything wrong with that.  Juliet plodded aimlessly while working day and night....all in the hope that she could one day return and visit her brother, no I mean, sister and be the uncle, no I mean aunt, that she's always hoped to be.  What is to become of our resident mad scientist as she seeks new fodder for her work?  Will she turn Lost into The Island of Doctor Moreau, mixing guinea pig genes with Ben to make a Bennea Pig?  Tune in next week for another edition of As the Juliet Turns.....
Disclaimer: that is all speculation...

Rachel is a female. There is no doubt about that.

Offline puff6962

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #21 on: April 18, 2007, 06:26:17 PM »
Yes, I was only writing how it could have happened and spiced things up a little with that part about the guinea pig DNA.

Offline Fallybear

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #22 on: April 18, 2007, 07:38:48 PM »
Don't worry Puff. Most of us knew you were joking.

Offline puff6962

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #23 on: April 18, 2007, 08:01:26 PM »
Ooooooo...you're onto me.  I'll try to get serious after tonight's episode.

Offline Chefpyro

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #24 on: April 18, 2007, 08:42:37 PM »
In the episode where Eko visits the psycho that told Claire not to( then changed his mind) raise her baby, the medical report had a script error. ( it had an address from Hawaii ) Lost execs are sloppy when it comes to medically related props. I think.
<------Pyro[move]

Offline puff6962

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Re: Is Rachel Really a Ray?
« Reply #25 on: April 18, 2007, 09:04:43 PM »
Are you telling me that Claire is a man too?  Crap, that means that Jack has a brother!  Stop the insanity, let's have an episode where everybody drops their pants so we can separate the peaches from the pears.

I noticed early the Hurley (that rhymes) had man boobs....moobs.  Maybe he is pregnant too.

It's been a long week folks and I need new material.