Author Topic: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner  (Read 6369 times)

Offline JMart

  • In the Loop
  • ****
  • Posts: 1664
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2007, 10:15:43 PM »
He is probably watching a movie. I can tell you it means nothing.

Not every piece of clothing, furniture or spoken word needs its own thread.

i think this means something. sorry :(





why is it cut like that? i mean come on.. it tells an obvious story

Offline ChellyKins

  • DHARMA Work Man (or Woman)
  • *****
  • Posts: 4229
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2007, 10:45:15 PM »
He is probably watching a movie. I can tell you it means nothing.

Not every piece of clothing, furniture or spoken word needs its own thread.

i think this means something. sorry :(





why is it cut like that? i mean come on.. it tells an obvious story

What story does it tell then??

Offline puff6962

  • In the Loop
  • ****
  • Posts: 1074
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2007, 11:14:34 PM »
Thank you, somebody finally listened to it.....now, who is the Cobra?

Offline casino

  • Red Shirt
  • **
  • Posts: 393
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2007, 04:55:17 PM »
I think that what you might be hearing is channels flipping.  It doesn't sound like just one show, but snippets of a few shows.  Maybe he was channel surfing.

Offline KateReallyLovesJack

  • In the Loop
  • ****
  • Posts: 1628
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2007, 05:12:36 PM »
I thought at first that it was the news but then it sounded like a movie. I agree with Jug that it doesn't matter, just the initial thought that was in my mind was that, ANOTHER lostie was in the news! But no, didn't happen!

Offline puff6962

  • In the Loop
  • ****
  • Posts: 1074
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #20 on: March 28, 2007, 12:14:36 PM »
Has anyone watched the new preview on the abc site, THE COBRA.  What locke was watching was important. 

Offline PrincessLeia

  • Dharma VIP
  • *******
  • Posts: 19233
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2007, 09:51:04 PM »
NICE CATCH, PUFF!!! 

YOU'RE AWESOME!!! :)

Offline Ladybug

  • Dharma VIP
  • *******
  • Posts: 20841
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2007, 09:55:25 PM »
okay i just caught it on darkufo.  NOW i get the cobra comment and the razzle dazzle comment. 

Offline jugdish

  • Dharma VIP
  • *******
  • Posts: 16716
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2007, 12:05:59 AM »
At SWLS we keep things a little more polite than your last post. It was a cute connection but I still stand by my first statement, it means nothing. It has nothing to do with the story, just a little easter egg.

Please keep things more friendly here on SWLS.

Offline Ladybug

  • Dharma VIP
  • *******
  • Posts: 20841
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2007, 12:15:54 AM »
You guys need to think THRICE before dub people's comments stupid based only in the fact that they aren't one of your pals.
Jugdish sounded proud to be be stupid and you guys happy to follow him blindly.
Puff is avenged.
it wasn't that we didn't want to agree with someone who wasn't a pal, or thinking the comments as "stupid", i for one felt like I was the stupid one, because i had no idea what puff was talking about the cobra?  i didn't get the connection.  NOW i understand, but without the preview video (which isn't in this thread) nor the episode, the comments made were senseless.  i didn't understand them. 

i never thought the comments were STUPID.  a little out there maybe, but not stupid.  i have agreed with puff on other things, and i have had discussions on other things.  there are many issues i don't agree with my "pals" on.  they even have some theories that are WAY out there to me. 

my point is, we are all entitiled to our opinions, and that goes both ways.  if someone can post their thoughts on an episode, i should be able to do the same, even if they don't agree.  if i question someone, it's because i want to better understand why they believe what they believe. 

if i ever do think someone's opinion or post is  stupid, i will just ignore it, that way it will eventually get burried in the archives.

Offline JMart

  • In the Loop
  • ****
  • Posts: 1664
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2007, 11:37:48 AM »
werd.. i knew it meant something.. and you people doubted me! :'(

Offline PrincessLeia

  • Dharma VIP
  • *******
  • Posts: 19233
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2007, 02:44:20 PM »

NICE CATCH, JMART!!! 

YOU'RE AWESOME!!! :)

Offline puff6962

  • In the Loop
  • ****
  • Posts: 1074
    • View Profile
Re: The Television Before Locke's TV Dinner
« Reply #27 on: March 31, 2007, 07:15:05 PM »
BEHIND WINGED VICTORY:

The original Winged Victory of Samothrace was created by the Greeks in the period between 190-180 BC and is considered one of the Louvre's three greatest masterpieces, together with Leonardo's Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo sculpture. Winged Victory, which is 8 feet tall, portrays the Greek Goddess of Victory standing on the prow of a ship with her wings spread and her clinging garments rippling in the wind as she descends from the sky to celebrate the naval triumph of the fleet. In creating the Lasker Awards, Mary Lasker conceived and designed the Winged Victory statuette, which is 1 foot tall, to symbolize a body of creative biomedical research that produces "victory over disability, disease, and death."

Winged Victory was discovered in 1863 on the Aegean island of Samothrace by an amateur French archeologist in a mutilated and shattered state consisting of more than 200 fragments of marble. Within one year after being unearthed, the fragments were shipped to the Louvre where they were reassembled over a 20-year period. The original fragments did not include the wings and the ship pedestal, which were discovered in later excavations. The head and the arms have never been found. The right hand was found in 1950.

The first restoration of Winged Victory was completed in three years, and the sculpture was first displayed in 1866, without wings and without the ship pedestal. Because of its fragmented condition, it was originally placed in a crowded, poorly lit back room of the Louvre where it stood "buried" among many more imposing statues. Once the wings and ship pedestal were restored, the curators of the Louvre decided that Winged Victory should be moved to a more prominent site so that its monumentality could be appreciated by the viewing public.

In 1883, Winged Victory was installed under a sky-lit cupola on the upper landing of the museum's Grand Stairway, which at that time was the sole entrance into the Louvre. This new placement ensured that Winged Victory would be seen by every visitor to the Louvre. But, despite this new premier location, Winged Victory was not centered directly under the cupola, and it shared the spotlight with other classical sculptures that lined the stairwell of the Grand Stairway. It was also surrounded by decorative images on the walls and ceiling of the upper landing.

It was not until 1932 that masterpiece status was conferred on Winged Victory when a new generation of curators at the Louvre singled it out for solo display in the Grand Stairway. The stairwell was cleared of all statues, all wall and ceiling displays were removed, and Winged Victory was repositioned in the center of the cupola. On entering the Louvre, all visitors now encountered only one piece of art - Winged Victory in all its grandeur.

The Louvre's 1932 installation of Winged Victory at the top of the Grand Stairway was so magnificent and monumental that the setting was soon copied by the Metropolitan Museum here in New York. During World War II, the Metropolitan installed a replica of Winged Victory at the top of its Grand Stairway.

The 50-year history of how Winged Victory advanced in the hierarchy of the Louvre from a collection of marble fragments to a reassembled statue of relative obscurity to its preeminent position at the top of the Grand Stairway raises the fundamental questions of what makes certain art great art and how does a piece of art become singled out and elevated to the status of masterpiece.

The same questions can be asked of scientific research. What makes certain science great science? How does a fragmentary piece of scientific research (like the fragments of Winged Victory) evolve over many years into a compelling scientific story (like the reassembled Winged Victory) so that it gets singled out by Lasker Jurors (like Louvre curators) to become a scientific masterpiece (like achieving solo presentation in the Grand Stairway)?

There is no better way to ponder these questions than to learn about the personal stories behind the scientific masterpieces created by this year's Lasker Basic and Clinical awardees. As you'll hear in a moment, each of our awardees has a great story to tell - as tortuous and exciting as the 50-year story behind Winged Victory's rise from shattered fragments to reassembled masterpiece.
 
 
Behind Winged Victory thus refers to fragments of work and thought combining into a compelling notion or hypothesis which, over a span of time, builds into a solid and magnificent work.

In a way, it may be a metaphor for the characters of the show. 

C S Lewis, when asked how he could come to find faith in such a time (1940's England) of evil, and how God could tolerate so much individual suffering, answered with the following metaphor.  He stated that God see's each man as a unrefined block of marble.  Over time, He begins his work shaping his creation.  Each blow is precise and shapeful, but each blow is painful.  However, the result...in the end...is a masterpiece.

Is this the purpose of the island?  Are the blows shown in the flashbacks a method of shaping individuals? 

I beg to ask the question, are the past experiences of the Losties real, or have they been implanted by the Other's?  In which case, a follow-up question, are the losties simply past members of the Others who got lost in the Magic Box? 

And, thank you for your support, I like feeling avenged.