Author Topic: The Tempest  (Read 1839 times)

Offline apriori

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The Tempest
« on: February 15, 2007, 09:53:08 AM »
When Desmond told Penny's dad that he worked on set design for the R.S.C. (did we know that before?) my mind immediately shot to The Tempest by William Shakespeare.
For those who don't know, it's (basically) about a sorcerer (Prospero) who lives on an island with his daughter, before he became a sorcerer he was cast into exile by a group of people, he then uses his magic to wreck those people like 15 years later on the same island, where his daughter falls in love with one of the men, more or less against Prospero's wishes. In the end Prospero lets his enemies go instead of destroying them, and nobody really knows for sure why to this day.
What do you guys think? There are obviously some parallels but I think it was just thrown in there for fun by the producers.

Offline uofapiglet

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Re: The Tempest
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2007, 03:42:48 PM »
I hadn't thought about The Tempest at all, but I did find it interesting that Desmond had a previous occupation doing set design for the R.S.C. and Shakespeare is always a fun topic... Nice parallels here...

Offline WhatThe

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Re: The Tempest
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2007, 07:46:10 PM »
Did Shakespear write any plays featuring four-toed giants?...lol

Offline surfmadpig

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Re: The Tempest
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2007, 08:05:08 PM »
Great job pointing out the Tempest allusion!! It's occurred to me too, surprisingly only about a month ago although The Tempest is my favorite Shakespearean play and I love Lost.

In my opinion, the supernatural element in lost, which seems to adjust itself differently to each character, depending on their past wishes, faults and personality, is quite similar to Prospero's control of events on the tempest island through the spirit Ariel. In both cases they get "personalized" treatment, in a way their guilt (or the guilt they should have had) assumes form and haunts them literally. Of course that doesn't explain the others etc, but that's the most boring part of lost for me :b


By the way, although I certainly know that this is not a forum for Shakespearean discussion,
In the end Prospero lets his enemies go instead of destroying them, and nobody really knows for sure why to this day.
It's quite obvious to most analysts that the reason Prospero lets them go is because he, during the course of the play, has matured enough to know that a) revenge does not equal salvation but forgiving does and b) they have suffered enough for their "sins" from the things he causes to happen to them.
again apologies for the slightly off-topic remark here.

Offline JBRam

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Re: The Tempest
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2007, 09:30:30 PM »
Great job pointing out the Tempest allusion!! It's occurred to me too, surprisingly only about a month ago although The Tempest is my favorite Shakespearean play and I love Lost.

In my opinion, the supernatural element in lost, which seems to adjust itself differently to each character, depending on their past wishes, faults and personality, is quite similar to Prospero's control of events on the tempest island through the spirit Ariel. In both cases they get "personalized" treatment, in a way their guilt (or the guilt they should have had) assumes form and haunts them literally. Of course that doesn't explain the others etc, but that's the most boring part of lost for me :b


By the way, although I certainly know that this is not a forum for Shakespearean discussion,
In the end Prospero lets his enemies go instead of destroying them, and nobody really knows for sure why to this day.
It's quite obvious to most analysts that the reason Prospero lets them go is because he, during the course of the play, has matured enough to know that a) revenge does not equal salvation but forgiving does and b) they have suffered enough for their "sins" from the things he causes to happen to them.
again apologies for the slightly off-topic remark here.
Not off topic. You can translate at least B into the show. Thanks!

Offline LostGirlDeb

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Re: The Tempest
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2007, 10:06:55 PM »
Did Shakespear write any plays featuring four-toed giants?...lol

LMAO!! on that!!! that there was funny s**t!! sorry guys!! we do have to keep a sense of humor around here or we will all go nuts and have "flashbacks" of our own