Author Topic: MacCutcheon Whiskey  (Read 1064 times)

Offline solost

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MacCutcheon Whiskey
« on: February 25, 2010, 10:49:22 AM »
As Jack is helping his mother look for the will, she offers him a drink. Between the two bottles to her left is a good old bottle of.......MacCutcheon 60 year old whiskey. TPTB are really great with these little details,it's one of the many reasons I love this show. What are we going to do when its over?

Offline lostfan777

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Re: MacCutcheon Whiskey
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2010, 11:02:30 AM »
We'd better start stocking up on some MacCutcheon's!   :'(

Offline solost

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Re: MacCutcheon Whiskey
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2010, 11:44:31 AM »
We'd better start stocking up on some MacCutcheon's!   :'(
I'll drink to that BROTHA!

Offline IFP

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Re: MacCutcheon Whiskey
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2010, 03:05:19 PM »
Please, it's Scotch WHISKY  ;)

Offline lostfan777

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Re: MacCutcheon Whiskey
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2010, 12:19:14 PM »
From Wikipedia:

The word "whisky" is believed to have been coined by soldiers of King Henry II who invaded Ireland in the 12th century as they struggled to pronounce the native Irish words uisce beatha [ɪʃkʲə bʲahə], meaning "water of life". Over time, the pronunciation changed from "whishkeyba" (an approximation of how the Irish term sounds) to "whisky". The name itself is a Gaelic calque of the Latin phrase aqua vitae, meaning "water of life".[37]

At one time, all whisky was spelled without the "e", as "whisky". In around 1870, the reputation of Scottish whisky was very poor as Scottish distilleries flooded the market with cheaper spirits produced using the Coffey still. The Irish and American distilleries adopted the spelling "whiskey", with the extra "e", to distinguish their higher quality product. Today, the spelling whisky (plural whiskies) is generally used for whiskies distilled in Scotland, Wales, Canada, and Japan, while whiskey is used for the spirits distilled in Ireland and America. Even though a 1968 directive of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms specifies "whisky" as the official US spelling, it allows labeling as "whiskey" in deference to tradition and most U.S. producers still use the historical spelling. Exceptions such as Early Times, Maker's Mark, and George Dickel are usually indicative of a Scottish heritage.[6]

In the late Victorian era, Irish whiskey was the world's most popular whisky. Of the Irish whiskeys, Dublin whiskeys were regarded as the grands crus of whiskeys. In order to differentiate Dublin whiskey from other whiskies, the Dublin distilleries adopted the spelling "whiskey". The other Irish distilleries eventually followed suit. The last Irish "whisky" was Paddy, which adopted the "e" in 1966.[6]

"Scotch" is the internationally recognized term for "Scotch whisky" however it is rarely used in Scotland, where blended whisky is generally referred to as "whisky" and single or vatted malt whisky as "malt".[38]

In many Latin-American countries, whisky (wee-skee) is used as a photographer's cue to smile, supplanting English "cheese". The Uruguayan film Whisky got its name because of this.